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Lands’ End uses dynamic videos, Twitter for breast cancer awareness

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October 22, 2014

landsendApparel and accessories retailer Lands’ End is extending the reach of its breast cancer awareness efforts on Twitter by requesting user-generated content and showcasing employees telling their personal stories related to the disease.

The video includes warehouse footage of sewing machines knitting the corresponding breast cancer awareness logos onto merchandise along with a few monologues of how employees have been personally affected by breast cancer. By adding a personal touch to its campaign and leveraging mobile video and social, Lands’ End extends the range of its efforts which have already garnered 4,800 responses.

“Consumers are connecting and consuming information on mobile devices more than ever before,” said Michele Casper, senior director of public relations at Lands’ End, Madison, WI. “In fact, we know that 40 percent of our YouTube videos are viewed on mobile devices.

“As a result, the Lands’ End Pink Thread Project was created to extend reach across multiple platforms including a heartfelt video that can be accessed on mobile devices,” she said. “The Pink Thread Project video truly captures the essence of the campaign unlike any other communication vehicle and we are excited to present the details of the campaign in such a far-reaching dynamic way.”

Mobile influencers
On Twitter, Lands’ End is promoting its Pink Thread campaign using hashtag #PinkThread. When followers tweet a photo of Pink Threads in their lives, the retailer will donate $1, up to $10,000, to BreastCancer.org.

Lands’ End’s campaign uses the terminology Pink Thread to symbolize the many that are affected, directly or indirectly, by breast cancer. By posting photos of their connection to breast cancer, consumers can easily help others because of Lands’ End’s efforts.

The Pink Thread project is further explained on Lands’ End’s Web site with a YouTube video. The video explains the retailer’s creation of specialized logos that can be sewn on purchases. There are several to choose from, and all have bright pink thread.


The Pink Thread Project

The logos can be sewn on bags, towels and clothes. Lands’ End chose this idea because of its expertise in monogramming. Through these efforts, consumers can quietly showcase their support for breast cancer awareness.

Through Oct. 31, consumers can purchase an embroidered logo for $6, and Lands’ End will donate 75 percent of the fee to Breastcancer.org.

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Logo embroidery options

Socially inclined
While Lands’ End’s target audience tends to be predominately older women, their mobile efforts over the past years have been slow to start, but the retailer has found its niche on social media sites such as Twitter.

In August, Lands’ End gave away a free pair of jeans to its Twitter followers as families prepped for the back-to-school season by packing away their shorts and shopping for long pants.

While many retailers’ back-to-school efforts have utilized video this season, Lands’ End is using Twitter to further connect with social users and its followers (see story).

In 2012, Lands’ End used an SMS message that not only reminded consumers to buy a Mother’s Day gift but also drove them to a mobile site to buy gift cards.

Lands’ End sent two different SMS messages over a two-week period that encouraged users to shop for Mother’s Day gifts from the company’s mobile site. The text messages were sent on April 25 and May 9 (see story).

Being that Lands’ End is a social retailer, leveraging social networks has shown success for its business.

“Lands’ End has a long history of engaging with customers even before social media,” Ms. Casper said. “Platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest are just other ways we can instantly have a dialogue with consumers.

“Our social efforts for the Pink Thread Project a big part of the campaign,” she said. “Not only because it helps to generate awareness of the effort but also because the social initiatives are way for followers to get involved in a simple way.

“Currently, almost 600 Twitter and Facebook followers have changed their profile pictures pink, while another 4,800 have shared their stories and retweeted breast cancer awareness tips while including campaign hashtag #PinkThread.”

Final Take
Caitlyn Bohannon is an editorial assistant on Mobile Commerce Daily, New York

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